Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Cyber Mentors

ProQuest Document View - Cyberbullying and Academic Achievement: Research Into the Rates of Incidence, Knowledge of Consequences, and Behavioral Patterns of Cyberbullying

ProQuest Document View - Cyberbullying and Academic Achievement: Research Into the Rates of Incidence, Knowledge of Consequences, and Behavioral Patterns of Cyberbullying:

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Cyberbullying takes place through the information technology that students access every day: cell phones, text messages, email, Internet messaging, social networks, pictures, and video clips. With the world paying more attention to this new form of bullying, scholars have been researching the topic in an attempt to learn more about this phenomenon. However, there are few research studies directly examining the relationship between academic achievement and cyberbullying; this dissertation examined that relationship. Data collected from a questionnaire provided to 847 middle school students in a Northeastern city revealed that higher-achieving students were no more likely to understand the risks involved with using the Internet than students who earned lower grades. Students who had self-reported participation in a gifted program and students who did not were equally likely to have involvement in cyberbullying as either a target, bully, or both. The most statistically significant factor in predicting a relationship to involvement with cyberbullying was a history of involvement with traditional bullying. Either as a target or a bully, having a history of this form of bullying meant a student was more likely to be both a cyberbully and a cyberbullying target.

Op-Ed Contributors - The Myth of Mean Girls - NYTimes.com

Op-Ed Contributors - The Myth of Mean Girls - NYTimes.com:

IF nine South Hadley, Mass., high school students — seven of them girls — are proved to have criminally bullied another girl who then committed suicide, as prosecutors have charged, they deserve serious legal and community condemnation.

However, many of the news reports and inflamed commentaries have gone beyond expressing outrage at the teenagers involved and instead invoked such cases as evidence of a modern epidemic of “mean girls” that adults simply fail to comprehend.

Obama Administration Promotes Panic Over Bullying Despite Fall in Bullying - Washington DC SCOTUS | Examiner.com

Obama Administration Promotes Panic Over Bullying Despite Fall in Bullying - Washington DC SCOTUS | Examiner.com: "The Obama Administration claims bullying is an “epidemic” and a “pandemic.” But in reality, bullying and violence have steadily gone down in the nation’s schools, as studies funded by the Justice Department have shown."

Monday, November 21, 2011

Youth Violence Project - School Shootings Statistics

Youth Violence Project - School Shootings Statistics: "Contrary to public perception, school homicides declined after 1993, although from 1997 to 1999 there was a series of copycat shootings stimulated by unprecedented media coverage."

Friday, November 18, 2011

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Online bullying: Still way less common than in real life | Safe and Secure - CNET News

Online bullying: Still way less common than in real life | Safe and Secure - CNET News: "A new study entitled Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Networks confirms much of what we already know about cyberbullying. Most kids aren't bullied and most kids don't bully either online or off."

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Friday, November 11, 2011

Family Online Safety Institute

Family Online Safety Institute
November 10, 2011
FOSI's New Report Evaluates the Global State of Online Safety in 2011

Washington D.C. - Today, FOSI publishes its State of Online Safety Report to coincide with its Fifth Annual Conference in Washington, DC. Containing more than 60 pages of expert commentary and analysis, this exciting new report includes comprehensive regional profiles, maps and best practice case studies. Complete with a global overview of risks and insights into topics like digital citizenship, it brings together in one document a comprehensive appraisal of the state of online safety in 2011.

This report is based upon the findings from FOSI's Global Resource and Information Directory (GRID), a unique online portal which provides users with extensive information on education, regulation, safety initiatives and usage from 194 countries, the 50 US states, and the Canadian and Australian provinces. GRID aggregates content and showcases best practice, much of which has never before been translated into English. This information will provide an invaluable resource for everyone involved in the quickly evolving online safety world, with examples of reasonable oversight measures, best practices, new markets, innovative ideas and baseline statistics.

To download the State of Online Safety Report go to www.fosi.org/resources/fosi-publications.html and register for free access to GRID at www.fosigrid.org

Funded by Nominet Trust, this report has also received generous support from FOSI members, who have contributed generously to GRID in terms of time, material, expertise and sponsorship to the ensure its high quality and success.
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Friday, November 4, 2011

CiteULike: Preference for Violent Electronic Games and Aggressive Behavior among Children: The Beginning of the Downward Spiral?

CiteULike: Preference for Violent Electronic Games and Aggressive Behavior among Children: The Beginning of the Downward Spiral?:

A one-year longitudinal study with 324 German third and fourth graders was conducted in order to find out whether a preference for violent electronic games socializes children to become more aggressive or whether aggressive individuals tend to select this type of game. Cross-lagged panel analyses suggest that children who were rated as openly aggressive at Time 1 intensified their preference for violent electronic games over time. We determined that it could be ruled out that this selection effect was due to a number of underlying variables ranging from ecological variables (neighborhood) to family variables (migration status, older brother) and child variables (gender, self-esteem, level of achievement). Discussion focuses on the emerging preference for violent electronic games among children. A one-year longitudinal study with 324 German third and fourth graders was conducted in order to find out whether a preference for violent electronic games socializes children to become more aggressive or whether aggressive individuals tend to select this type of game. Cross-lagged panel analyses suggest that children who were rated as openly aggressive at Time 1 intensified their preference for violent electronic games over time. We determined that it could be ruled out that this selection effect was due to a number of underlying variables ranging from ecological variables (neighborhood) to family variables (migration status, older brother) and child variables (gender, self-esteem, level of achievement). Discussion focuses on the emerging preference for violent electronic games among children.

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KIDS REACT TO BULLYING

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