Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Special issue on bystanders in online aggression published


Dear researchers, colleagues, and readers interested in internet-related research,

Bystanders witnessing online aggression can make a difference - if they choose to intervene. Read the special issue devoted to these important actors in online world published at the end of 2018. The issue was edited by Hana Machackova (Masaryk University, Brno, Czechia), Jan Pfetsch (Technische Universität, Berlin, Germany), and Georges Steffgen (University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg). The issue contains 6 articles: a systematic review focused on the personal and contextual factors which may facilitate or inhibit the bystanders’ actions; empirical elaboration on the participant roles of cyberbullying; studies grasping the specificity of online aggression and its impact on bystanders’ responses; investigation of negativity and aggression in celebrity-news articles and following readers’ discussions; and a study providing evidence about negative consequences of bystanders’ experiences.

We believe the issue presents a unique collection of new  insights in this timely research field. Enjoy the reading!

Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace
https://cyberpsychology.eu
IF (2017): 1.400
SJR (2017): 0.774
ISSN: 1802-7962

 
The issue content:

Editorial: Special issue on bystanders of online aggression
Hana Machackova, Jan Pfetsch and Georges Steffgen
Article 1
A systematic literature review of factors that moderate bystanders’ actions in cyberbullying
Fernando Domínguez-Hernández, Lars Bonell and Alejandro Martínez-González
 
Article 3:
Bystanders of bullying: Social-cognitive and affective reactions to school bullying and cyberbullying
Rhea-Katharina Knauf, Heike Eschenbeck, and Michael Hock

 
Article 5:
Joining the clash or refusing to bash? Bystanders reactions to online celebrity bashing
Gaëlle Ouvrein, Charlotte J.S. De Backer and Heidi Vandebosch


Article 6:
The moderation of empathy in the longitudinal association between witnessing cyberbullying, depression, and anxiety
Michelle F. Wright, Sebastian Wachs and Bridgette D. Harper





Saturday, December 8, 2018

As "Fortnite" Blows Up, Parents Need to Up Their Game

A new survey confirms what most parents already know: Kids are going crazy for "Fortnite." Here are some practical tips to manage it. By Sierra Filucci 12/5/2018

Monday, November 26, 2018

Sexual harassment goes high tech with iPhone's AirDrop

Without the proper settings, iPhone users can receive lewd and threatening messages from strangers, which can be triggering for survivors of sexual assault.

By Avichai Scher
Abigail Mentzer was riding the New York City subway to a doctor’s appointment when she says an AirDrop request popped up on her iPhone. A preview image of the file showed a CD with the handwritten message, “Songs I’ll choke you out to while wrecking your uterus.”

Feeling disgusted and threatened, she looked around the train car, wondering who had sent it. Then, three more messages came through, including images of a woman’s bare behind and more offensive language.

Read more: https://www.nbcnews.com/health/sexual-health/sexual-harassment-goes-high-tech-iphone-s-airdrop-n932326?cid=eml_nbn_20181125

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

The Skinny on Screen Time: Common Sense Over Research (at least for now)



There has long been a fervent debate about the potential impacts of screen time on youth. When our son was born in 2010, the American Academy of Pediatricians recommended no screen time for children under the age of two. The guidelines have softened a bit in recent years, but the group still generally promotes less rather than more time in front of screens for toddlers and young children.

Read more: https://cyberbullying.org/the-skinny-on-screen-time

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