Wednesday, December 28, 2011

A year of too much work or too little - KansasCity.com

... A year of too much work or too little - KansasCity.com: Earlier this year, I dared to put the question out there: Can you control after-hours work demands without getting fired or losing a customer?

My favorite response came from Wayne A. Hochwarter, a professor of management at Florida State University. It's all about communication, he said. Maybe you're answering emails at 10 p.m., but your manager doesn't expect you to be on call at all hours. You may have inadvertently communicated the wrong message: that you don't mind the infringement on your personal time. It's possible to pull back - if you are clear about how you plan to handle their needs during the workday, he said.

Monday, December 19, 2011

Sexting game making 'Rounds' at local middle school - NBCActionNews.com - Kansas City

Sexting game making 'Rounds' at local middle school - NBCActionNews.com - Kansas City: LIBERTY, Mo. - There's a new game of chicken making the rounds in the halls of at least two local middle schools. It is growing in popularity and bringing sexting to a new, frightening level.

What chat slang is important for parents to know?

What chat slang is important for parents to know?

Suicide and Bullying BRIEF

This issue brief examines the relationship between suicide and bullying among children and adolescents, with special attention to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. It also explores strategies for preventing these problems.

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Microsoft Online Safety Event Planning Guide

Microsoft Online Safety Event Planning Guide: A guide to planning an online safety event
This guide helps you organize and conduct an online safety event for consumers.

Safely | online monitoring for parents and children

Safely | online monitoring for parents and children: Social Monitor is a free service for parents with kids on Facebook

Media and Technology Resources for Educators | Common Sense Media

Media and Technology Resources for Educators | Common Sense Media

Standing up, Not Standing By: A Free Cyberbullying Toolkit for Educators

Use this kit from Commonsense Media to stop cyberbullies in their tracks. It has the materials you need to show students how to stand up when they see digital harassment happening and to help you create a positive school culture where kids can thrive – both online and off. It offers easy access to our two best lessons on cyberbullying for each grade level. You'll find engaging, turn-key instruction for your classroom.
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators

Netsmartz Tip Sheets

Tip Sheets: Cyberbullying. Sexting. Social Networking. NetSmartz Workshop introduces you to these and other important Internet safety topics through tip sheets for children and their trusted adults. Use them to educate yourself and others in your community about the main online risks, to accompany NetSmartz Internet safety presentations, and to engage children in discussions about appropriate online behavior.

Contract for Responsible Cell Phone Us

Contract for Responsible Cell Phone Us

BeSeen - a Free Mobile App about Social Networking for Educators and Families

BeSeen - a Free Mobile App about Social Networking for Educators and Families

BeSeen is provided by Carnegie Mellon University and Web Wise Kids to teach youth how to be responsible in social networks by securing their private and personal information, protecting their online reputation and defending their peers. This online safety mobile application is a single-player game that simulates a social networking website. The player creates a profile and starts earning “friend” characters and interacting with them. They learn about others through their posts and help them through challenges in order to win awards and make new friends.

In BeSeen, the ultimate quest is to make friends. At first, that is a matter of getting involved in school activities, but as more friends join a social circle, they bring their problems with them. To keep friends and make more, it’s important not only to be involved but to be a good friend. Who is up for the challenge?

Friday, December 16, 2011

Bullying in Schools

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has released Bullying in Schools: An Overview

This bulletin examines the connection between different types and frequencies of bullying, truancy, and student achievement, and whether students’ engagement in school mediates these factors. It discusses the results of three studies conducted in 2007 at the National Center for School Engagement, and compares these results with those from a Swedish study. The authors conclude that victimization in the form of bullying can distance students from learning. Schools can overcome this negative effect if they adopt strategies that engage students in their work, creating positive learning environments that produce academic achievement.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Online Safety FAQ

Online Safety FAQ

Mostly good news about kids online, study finds | Safe and Secure - CNET News

Mostly good news about kids online, study finds | Safe and Secure - CNET News: A report from the University of New Hampshire's Crimes against Children Research Center shows a significant decrease in "unwanted online sexual solicitation" as well as "unwanted exposure to pornography" in recent years among children ages 10 to 17 years old. There was a small increase in online harassment.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Report Suicidal Content on Facebook

In partnership with the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, Facebook is announcing a new service that harnesses the power of social networking and crisis support to help prevent suicides across the Nation and Canada. The new service enables Facebook users to report a suicidal comment they see posted by a friend to Facebook using either the Report Suicidal Content link or the report links found throughout the site. The person who posted the suicidal comment will then immediately receive an email from Facebook encouraging them to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or to click on a link to begin a confidential chat session with a crisis worker.

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Christopher Ferguson: Video Games Don't Make Kids Violent | TIME Ideas | TIME.com

Christopher Ferguson: Video Games Don't Make Kids Violent | TIME Ideas | TIME.com: It’s the holiday season and that means that kids by the millions are asking Santa for the opportunity to blow away enemy soldiers and aliens on the Xbox or PlayStation. Should parents be worried about buying such gifts? Violent video games (VVG) are now an established part of our culture; recent releases of games such as Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 and Skyrim have been setting sales records for media releases (topping even blockbuster movies) and garnishing lavish reviews for their artistic merits. Ten years ago, scholars and politicians raised the possibility that such games might contribute to school shootings or other youth violence. What happened to these concerns?

Recent Bullying and Victimization Research

The Prevention Researcher Blog � Blog Archive � Recent Bullying and Victimization Research: In the past several weeks, numerous reports and bulletins about teenage bullying and victimization have crossed my desk and bounced into my inbox. Given that the topic of teen bullying is on our production schedule in 2012, I have been especially interested in these reports. While each report could be the basis for numerous blog posts, I’d like to share a highlight or two from each.

Education World: Bullying and Cyberbullying: Six Things Teachers Can Do

Thanks to its partnership with publisher Eye on Education, EducationWorld is pleased to present these tips, adapted from Dropout Prevention Fieldbook: Best Practices from the Field and 152 Ways to Keep Students in School: Effective, Easy-to-Implement Tips for Teachers, by Franklin Schargel.

Bullying is an ever-present problem in our schools, and can include physical threats, teasing, and harassment (National Association of School Psychologists). It is estimated that between 15 % and 30% of all students are either bullies or victims. Cyberbullying occurs when a child, preteen, or teen is bullied by another child, preteen, or teen using the Internet, or any interactive digital technology (www.stopcyberbullying.org).

Education World: Bullying and Cyberbullying: Six Things Teachers Can Do

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Once Posted You Lose it

Pause Before You Post™ on Facebook

Pause Before You Post™ on Facebook

Pledge to Pause Before You Post: I believe in making smart decisions when I share information online and want to spread the word to my friends, family and community about taking time to Pause Before You Post. Before I make a post, I pledge to ask myself: Who will be able to see what I post? Will anyone be embarrassed or hurt by it? Am I proud of what I'm posting? How I would feel if someone posted it about me? Pause Before You Post is a public service program from Jostens encouraging everyone to make smart decisions about personal publishing.

U.S. Education Department Releases Analysis of State Bullying Laws and Policies | U.S. Department of Education

U.S. Education Department Releases Analysis of State Bullying Laws and Policies | U.S. Department of Education: The U.S. Department of Education released today Analysis of State Bullying Laws and Policies, a new report summarizing current approaches in the 46 states with anti-bullying laws and the 41 states that have created anti-bullying policies as models for schools.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Dot-XXX Domains Go Live, Escalating Battle for Smutty URLs | PCWorld

Dot-XXX Domains Go Live, Escalating Battle for Smutty URLs | PCWorld: More than 100,000 porn websites sporting the .XXX domain went live today. The public launch of the .XXX domain is a culmination of years of struggle between the adult entertainment industry, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names & Numbers and ICM Registry, now the official registry of the new domain.

What Don't you See?


Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson went on a camping trip. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson went on a camping trip.
As they lay down for the night,
Holmes said: "Watson, look up into the sky and tell me what you see."
Watson said: "I see millions and millions of stars."

Holmes: "And what does that tell you?"
Watson: "Astronomically, it tells me that there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Theologically it tells me that God is great and that we are small and insignificant. Meteorologically it tells me that we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. What does it tell you?"
Holmes: "Somebody stole our tent."

Lesson: It is always easier to see what is in front of us than to notice that which is missing. All of the physical attractions of the world are "dangled" in front of our eyes. We see the new cars on the roads, we see the latest fashions on others, we see all of the advertisements. What don't we see? What we don't see is what is missing - solutions and exceptions.

Monday, December 5, 2011

Sexting far less prevalent than previously reported | Safe and Secure - CNET News

Sexting far less prevalent than previously reported | Safe and Secure - CNET News

A study published in the January, 2012 issue of Pediatrics asked teens whether they had sent or received sexually suggestive, nude or nearly nude images of themselves--a practice commonly known as "sexting."
What they found is that 2.5 percent of the 10- to 17-year-olds in the survey said they had appeared in or created images that depicted themselves nude or nearly nude. But, when the researchers asked if the images "showed breasts, genitals or someone's bottom," only 1.3 percent said they had appeared in or created such images. The "nude or nearly nude" category included youth wearing underwear or bathing suits or even fully clothed but in sexy poses.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Cyber Mentors

ProQuest Document View - Cyberbullying and Academic Achievement: Research Into the Rates of Incidence, Knowledge of Consequences, and Behavioral Patterns of Cyberbullying

ProQuest Document View - Cyberbullying and Academic Achievement: Research Into the Rates of Incidence, Knowledge of Consequences, and Behavioral Patterns of Cyberbullying:

'via Blog this'


Cyberbullying takes place through the information technology that students access every day: cell phones, text messages, email, Internet messaging, social networks, pictures, and video clips. With the world paying more attention to this new form of bullying, scholars have been researching the topic in an attempt to learn more about this phenomenon. However, there are few research studies directly examining the relationship between academic achievement and cyberbullying; this dissertation examined that relationship. Data collected from a questionnaire provided to 847 middle school students in a Northeastern city revealed that higher-achieving students were no more likely to understand the risks involved with using the Internet than students who earned lower grades. Students who had self-reported participation in a gifted program and students who did not were equally likely to have involvement in cyberbullying as either a target, bully, or both. The most statistically significant factor in predicting a relationship to involvement with cyberbullying was a history of involvement with traditional bullying. Either as a target or a bully, having a history of this form of bullying meant a student was more likely to be both a cyberbully and a cyberbullying target.

Op-Ed Contributors - The Myth of Mean Girls - NYTimes.com

Op-Ed Contributors - The Myth of Mean Girls - NYTimes.com:

IF nine South Hadley, Mass., high school students — seven of them girls — are proved to have criminally bullied another girl who then committed suicide, as prosecutors have charged, they deserve serious legal and community condemnation.

However, many of the news reports and inflamed commentaries have gone beyond expressing outrage at the teenagers involved and instead invoked such cases as evidence of a modern epidemic of “mean girls” that adults simply fail to comprehend.

Obama Administration Promotes Panic Over Bullying Despite Fall in Bullying - Washington DC SCOTUS | Examiner.com

Obama Administration Promotes Panic Over Bullying Despite Fall in Bullying - Washington DC SCOTUS | Examiner.com: "The Obama Administration claims bullying is an “epidemic” and a “pandemic.” But in reality, bullying and violence have steadily gone down in the nation’s schools, as studies funded by the Justice Department have shown."

Monday, November 21, 2011

Youth Violence Project - School Shootings Statistics

Youth Violence Project - School Shootings Statistics: "Contrary to public perception, school homicides declined after 1993, although from 1997 to 1999 there was a series of copycat shootings stimulated by unprecedented media coverage."

Friday, November 18, 2011

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Online bullying: Still way less common than in real life | Safe and Secure - CNET News

Online bullying: Still way less common than in real life | Safe and Secure - CNET News: "A new study entitled Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Networks confirms much of what we already know about cyberbullying. Most kids aren't bullied and most kids don't bully either online or off."

'via Blog this'

Friday, November 11, 2011

Family Online Safety Institute

Family Online Safety Institute
November 10, 2011
FOSI's New Report Evaluates the Global State of Online Safety in 2011

Washington D.C. - Today, FOSI publishes its State of Online Safety Report to coincide with its Fifth Annual Conference in Washington, DC. Containing more than 60 pages of expert commentary and analysis, this exciting new report includes comprehensive regional profiles, maps and best practice case studies. Complete with a global overview of risks and insights into topics like digital citizenship, it brings together in one document a comprehensive appraisal of the state of online safety in 2011.

This report is based upon the findings from FOSI's Global Resource and Information Directory (GRID), a unique online portal which provides users with extensive information on education, regulation, safety initiatives and usage from 194 countries, the 50 US states, and the Canadian and Australian provinces. GRID aggregates content and showcases best practice, much of which has never before been translated into English. This information will provide an invaluable resource for everyone involved in the quickly evolving online safety world, with examples of reasonable oversight measures, best practices, new markets, innovative ideas and baseline statistics.

To download the State of Online Safety Report go to www.fosi.org/resources/fosi-publications.html and register for free access to GRID at www.fosigrid.org

Funded by Nominet Trust, this report has also received generous support from FOSI members, who have contributed generously to GRID in terms of time, material, expertise and sponsorship to the ensure its high quality and success.
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Friday, November 4, 2011

CiteULike: Preference for Violent Electronic Games and Aggressive Behavior among Children: The Beginning of the Downward Spiral?

CiteULike: Preference for Violent Electronic Games and Aggressive Behavior among Children: The Beginning of the Downward Spiral?:

A one-year longitudinal study with 324 German third and fourth graders was conducted in order to find out whether a preference for violent electronic games socializes children to become more aggressive or whether aggressive individuals tend to select this type of game. Cross-lagged panel analyses suggest that children who were rated as openly aggressive at Time 1 intensified their preference for violent electronic games over time. We determined that it could be ruled out that this selection effect was due to a number of underlying variables ranging from ecological variables (neighborhood) to family variables (migration status, older brother) and child variables (gender, self-esteem, level of achievement). Discussion focuses on the emerging preference for violent electronic games among children. A one-year longitudinal study with 324 German third and fourth graders was conducted in order to find out whether a preference for violent electronic games socializes children to become more aggressive or whether aggressive individuals tend to select this type of game. Cross-lagged panel analyses suggest that children who were rated as openly aggressive at Time 1 intensified their preference for violent electronic games over time. We determined that it could be ruled out that this selection effect was due to a number of underlying variables ranging from ecological variables (neighborhood) to family variables (migration status, older brother) and child variables (gender, self-esteem, level of achievement). Discussion focuses on the emerging preference for violent electronic games among children.

'via Blog this'

KIDS REACT TO BULLYING

Monday, October 31, 2011

Children's Week - Teens Only Town Hall Meeting

Children's Week - Teens Only Town Hall Meeting:

The "Teens Only" Town Hall Meeting and Youth Commission provides a forum and voice for students from across the state to work together with Florida's Children and Youth Cabinet to address important issues relating to children's services. The 20-member Cabinet, is comprised of government officials, policy makers, children's developmental and advocacy experts, and now a Youth Commission comprised of twelve students selected from a statewide pool of students.


'via Blog this'

Thursday, October 27, 2011

WSYX ABC6 On Your Side Top Story - Mother Calls Classroom Attack 'Hate Crime'

WSYX ABC6 On Your Side Top Story - Mother Calls Classroom Attack 'Hate Crime'

Take This Lollipop

Take This Lollipop:

This requires a Facebook account. Overly dramatic but really makes the point about privacy.

Vulnerable teens still at risk in cyberspace

Vulnerable teens still at risk in cyberspace

Oct 23, 2011 (The Buffalo News - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) -- The kind of online hatred and harassment Jamey Rodemeyer experienced when he was in middle school was far from unusual. Danielle Mazziotti said she sees it all the time, particularly on the Web pages of friends who are homosexual or overweight.
Read more: Vulnerable teens still at risk in cyberspace

Expert Anti-Bullying Panel Convened at Sesame Workshop


Expert Anti-Bullying Panel Convened at Sesame Workshop

NEW YORK, Oct. 26, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The iconic children's television show hosted this month a panel of anti-bullying experts, which included a representative from nonprofit Committee for Children, creators of the Steps to Respect bullying prevention curriculum that recently showed positive effects on bullying behaviors in a randomized controlled trial.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20111026/DC94224 )

The panel's discussion is presented in a 5-part video series titled "Happy to Be Me: An Anti-Bullying Discussion," and is available to parents on the Sesame Street website and YouTube Channel, along with other anti-bullying resources. Committee for Children program developer Mia Doces, M.Ed., served on the panel, which was moderated by Dr. Rosemarie Truglio, vice president of education and research at Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization that produces Sesame Street. The panel also included Dr. Catherine Bradshaw of Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence; Trudy Ludwig, author, My Secret Bully; Dr. Joseph Wright, MD, MPH, Children's National Medical Center; and Dr. Jamie Ostrov, SUNY Buffalo.

"We're all working toward the same goal: a world in which children can be safe from bullying," says Doces, "So it made sense to collaborate with experts who reach children and families in different contexts of their lives. Whether it's at school, at the doctor's office, or at home, we all strive to send the messages and teach the skills that can help parents and children deal with bullying."

Dr. Truglio convened the panel to coincide with a special Sesame Street episode in which Big Bird is bullied by another bird and learns what he can do to stop it.

"Sesame Workshop was pleased to partner with Committee for Children on our anti-bullying campaign for preschoolers. Both of our organizations' missions involve creating age-appropriate content to foster the development of children's pro-social skills and to develop healthy friendships in order to reduce aggressive behaviors. We look forward to future possible collaborations to enhance children's lives," says Dr. Truglio.

About Committee for ChildrenCommittee for Children is the world's leading provider of educational programs that teach skills to prevent bullying, violence, and child sexual abuse. To learn more, go to www.cfchildren.org.

SOURCE Committee for Children

Credit: Committee for Children

Monday, October 24, 2011

MTV's A Thin Line : Digital Rights Project : www.athinline.org

MTV AMPLIFIES YOUTH EFFORTS TO END DIGITAL ABUSE WITH “MTV DIGITAL
RIGHTS PROJECT”

MTV to Give Away Free Special-Edition Gear by Pete Wentz and Jac Vanek
to the first 10,000 People who join the “Digital Rights Project”

New York, NY – October 11, 2011 – Following the world premiere of the
original movie (DIS)CONNECTED, MTV is joining forces with its audience
to launch the crowd-sourced “MTV Digital Rights Project,” which
amplifies young peoples’ voices in the fight to end digital abuse.
Going beyond a pledge or simple list of do’s and don’ts, the project
is a living, evolving, youth-led effort in which teens and young
adults can declare and discuss their fundamental rights in a 24/7
connected world. This is the latest piece of MTV’s “A THIN LINE”
campaign, which has already empowered more than 1 million young people
to take action to stop the spread of digital abuse. MTV asked its
audience to share and vote on what they deserve when interacting
online and the audience rallied around the following rights:

Online and on my cell, I have the right to:
• Live without pressure or abuse.
• End unhealthy relationships.
• Step in and help if I see someone getting harassed.
• Take control of my decisions.
• Disconnect whenever I want.

Young people can support the “MTV Digital Rights Project” by adding
their names to the list via rights.athinline.org , by visiting the
campaign’s Facebook page or by texting “rights” to 66333.
Additionally, they can contribute by submitting new rights at
rights.athinline.org or by tweeting #ihavetheright_____ and filling in
the blank.

As a way to say thank you to the early supporters of the MTV Digital
Rights Project, the network will give a free, limited-edition A THIN
LINE bracelet or dog tag, designed by Pete Wentz and designer Jac
Vanek, to the first 10,000 people who join in. The pieces aim to
encourage young people to stand up instead of stand by when they see
someone’s digital rights being violated, and remind those who are
struggling with these issues that they’re connected to help and
support. The bracelet and dog tag are also meant to ignite a dialogue
about digital drama in the real world. For more information on how to
snag the items, visit gear.athinline.org .

“We all have the right to respect and support, and there’s no level of
abuse, harassment or bullying any of us should be forced to endure –
online or offline,” said Jason Rzepka, Vice President of Public
Affairs for MTV. “The Digital Rights Project is part of MTV’s
sustained commitment to supporting our audience as they navigate the
pitfalls of constant-connectedness and develop a code of ethics for
the digital age.”

The “MTV Digital Rights Project” is the latest in a series of youth-
led efforts from the “A THIN LINE” campaign to empower young people to
draw their own line between digital use and digital abuse. A Web and
iPhone app, “Over The Line?” lets young people share, read and rate
personal stories- from humorous to dramatic – about how cell phones
and social networks are impacting their social lives. Enabling youth
to ask peers if digital behavior has “crossed the line” as well as
rate others’ stories, “Over the Line?” has elicited a strong response
with more than 9,000 user-submitted stories generating over 325,000
ratings. Additionally, “Draw Your Line” is an interactive, online
visualization that celebrates the ways young people are taking action
to stop the cycle of online bullying and abuse. To date, more than
30,000 positive actions have been posted on the site.

For more information on MTV’s “A THIN LINE” please head to
http://www.ATHINLINE.org .

Vulnerable teens still at risk in cyberspace - Amherst - The Buffalo News

Vulnerable teens still at risk in cyberspace - Amherst - The Buffalo News: "“Basically, being online isn’t going to turn a child who is not at risk into an at-risk child,” said Willard, director of the Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use."

'via Blog this'

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Educational Games | Overview

For immediate release October 20, 2011

New game uses pirates to teach privacy protection skills to Canadian children

OttawaMedia Awareness Network (MNet) has launched Privacy Pirates, a new interactive resource to teach children about online privacy and how to distinguish between public and private information when playing on the Internet. The game was unveiled today by MNet’s Director of Education Matthew Johnsonat the Prince Edward Island Teachers’ Federation Conference in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

“For the most part, the Internet is an unregulated universe where users are constantly prodded for information regardless of their age; and children often lack the skills to understand how to protect their privacy on the sites they visit,” said Mr. Johnson. “Privacy Pirates explores the different scenarios kids encounter online and helps them understand what information is appropriate to give out and what information is better kept private.”

In the game, children attempt to assemble a map leading to pirate treasure -- introducing the concept that their information has value. Along the way, players encounter a variety of situations in which they are asked to give up information. Making the correct choice – based on the type of information they’re being asked to give, and the context in which they are being asked – is rewarded with an additional piece of the treasure map.

Privacy Pirates was developed with financial support from Google. It is part of MNet’s extensive suite of digital literacy games, which are freely available on its website at http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/games/index.cfm.

-30-

Media Awareness Network (MNet) is a Canadian not-for-profit centre for digital and media literacy. Its vision is that young people have the critical thinking skills to engage with media as active and informed digital citizens. MNet's programs are funded by its public and private sector sponsors, donors and partners, who include: Bell Media • Shaw •Bell • TELUS • CIRA • Google • National Film Board of Canada • Government of Canada.

Cathy Wing, Co-Executive Director, Media Awareness Network

613-224-7721 , Ext. 227, cwing@media-awareness.ca

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

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Rosalind Wiseman - Creating Cultures of Dignity
Dear Friends,
For more than a year, it has been a great privilege for me to work closely with the producers at Anderson Cooper 360 to put together a variety of programs that draw attention to the myriad of bullying-related issues that exist in our country. Beginning with AC360's first bullying special in the fall of 2010 following the Tyler Clementi suicide, Anderson and his producers have never ceased to impress me with their dedication to this topic, and their willingness to examine and discuss it in a way that inspires real conversation and action. This year we have put together what I believe is another truly fantastic special that aired Sunday night on CNN for the first time, and will air again later this week. Please check your local listings for AC360's Bullying: It Stops Here, onFriday, October 14. Additionally, the entire week of October 10-15, AC360 will air a special series on bullying at 8 and 10pm each night. You can learn more about all of Anderson Cooper's anti-bullying programming by clicking here.
One very important element in this year's anti-bullying special is the results of a survey commissioned by CNN and conducted by Dr. Robert Faris and Dr. Diane Femlee at UC Davis, which reveals compelling new data about bullying. I weighed in on the details of this survey and what parents can take away from it on this article I wrote for CNN.com. Dr. Faris and Dr. Femlee argue that "social combat"--the use of aggression to climb the social hierarchy--is responsible for the majority of bullying that occurs among kids today.
If you play any role in the life of a child, I hope you will share the information about the Bullying: It Stops Here special, AC360's commitment to this issue, and the Stop Bullying, Speak Up campaign that is being conducted jointly by Cartoon Network and the companies of Turner Broadcasting. Please take a few moments to sign the Facebook pledge, and to remember that keeping kids safe happens in small moments every day.
I'd love to know what you thought of the special, and how you and your family are stopping bullying and speaking up in your own lives. As always, you can find me on Facebook, Twitter, and email.
Thank you for your support!
Best,
Rosalind
P.O. Box 11263  Washington, DC 20008-999
info@rosalindwiseman.com
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Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Stop Bullying Now! Public Service Announcement - "Who"

Educators | StopBullying.gov

Educators | StopBullying.gov: "Bullying negatively affects the atmosphere of a school and disrupts the learning environment. Bullying is not something educators have to accept.

It takes the entire school community to create an inviting school where everyone feels they belong and are safe. Working together, administrators, teachers, school staff, parents, and students can help stop bullying in your school."

'via Blog this'

What is Bullying

From the American School Counselor Association

Learning First Alliance Member Resources on Bullying

Bullying | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights: "Students are more likely to thrive academically – as well as socially and emotionally – in schools they experience as safe and supportive. Bullies deprive students of that experience.

We must do all we can - as parents, educators, community leaders, business leaders, advocates and concerned citizens - to make it clear that we will not tolerate bullying in our public schools."

'via Blog this'

Sunday, October 9, 2011

MTV EXPLORES THE COLLISION OF LIFE, LOVE AND DIGITAL DRAMA WITH PREMIERE OF (DIS)CONNECTED ON OCTOBER 10 AT 9 P.M. ET/PT


MTV EXPLORES THE COLLISION OF LIFE, LOVE AND DIGITAL DRAMA WITH PREMIERE OF (DIS)CONNECTED ON OCTOBER 10 AT 9 P.M. ET/PT
Original TV Movie followed by MTV News Special with Jersey Shore’s Vinny Guadagnino, Dan Savage and SuChin Pak
at 11 p.m. ET/PT as part of MTV’s “A THIN LINE” Campaign
New York, NY, September 14, 2011 – MTV today announced it will premiere its newest original TV movie, (dis)connected, on Monday, October 10 at 9 p.m. ET/PT. (dis)connected tells the story of four young people whose lives unexpectedly collide online and illustrates how growing up digital can complicate life and love. Although the characters have never met in-person before, they have an extraordinary impact on one another, culminating in one night none of them could have imagined. To view a trailer for the film, click here. Immediately following the film at 11 p.m. ET/PT, MTV will broadcast a half-hour MTV News special hosted by SuChin Pak and Vinny Guadagnino ofJersey Shore, with panelists including Dan Savage talking with in-studio and online audiences about the key themes in the film, such as sexuality, relationships, trust and over-sharing in a digital world.
"(dis)connected captures our audience's struggle to manage the digital drama that is an everyday part of their lives," said Chris Linn, Executive Vice President of Programming, MTV. "This film supports the network’s ‘A THIN LINE’ campaign via an authentic, provocative piece of entertainment that explores the issue in unexpected ways."
The film’s interweaving narrative is told through four young people living in different cities, who know each other only through a live streaming site. Isaiah (Jordan Calloway, Parenthood) is a charismatic and popular contributor to the video chat site who struggles with his own demons and isolation offline, and has trouble relating to his girlfriend Nikki when they are together. Lisa's (Ana Coto, Trapped in the Closet, Gravity Hill) attraction to her boyfriend Jack – who she met online – heats up as she makes plans to meet up with him. Maria's (Lindsey Morgan, Friday Night Lights, Generation Y) constant texting of her boyfriend John ignites a break-up feud that extends to their friends and profiles. Tom (Justin Preston, Julia) refuses to reveal his identity when he posts his music online, but antagonizes others from the safety of his bedroom laptop. All of them are dealing with digital drama that complicates their lives in ways none of them expected.
(dis)connected is inspired in part by the true, tragic tale of Abraham Biggs, a 19-year-old who battled bipolar disorder and ultimately webcast his suicide after being egged on by a digital mob. The film, which was first announced during the White House Conference on Bullying Prevention, will air during National Bullying Prevention Month and serves as the latest programming connected to MTV’s multi-year “A THIN LINE” campaign.
MTV’s “A THIN LINE” campaign empowers America’s youth to identify, respond to, and stop the spread of digital abuse, which includes all forms of digital bullying, dating abuse and discrimination. Launched in late 2009, the campaign has already inspired more than 1 million young people to take action to stop digital abuse. As part of the campaign, MTV is addressing these issues through thought-provoking PSAs, integration into MTV's top-rated shows, innovative online and mobile tools, and curricula.
Director Leslie Libman has a long history with MTV's pro-social efforts; she helped create the first, and subsequent, Rock The Vote campaigns. Her other credits include HBO's Path to Paradise, the story of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, as well as episodes of The Wire, Entourage and NCIS. The movie is executive produced by Libman and Maggie Malina, the executive producer on many MTV movies, including Pedro, Worst. Prom. Ever.; and the My Super Psycho Sweet 16 franchise. Chris Linn serves as Executive Producer for MTV. (dis)connected will also air internationally on MTV channels around the world starting in January 2012.
For more information on (dis)connected head to www.disconnectedthemovie.com or for MTV’s “A THIN LINE” campaign, go to www.ATHINLINE.org.
About MTV:
MTV is the world’s premier youth entertainment brand. With a global reach of more than a half-billion households, MTV is the cultural home of the millennial generation, music fans and artists, and a pioneer in creating innovative programming for young people. MTV reflects and creates pop culture with its Emmy®, Grammy® and Peabody® award-winning content built around compelling storytelling, music discovery and activism across TV, online and mobile. MTV’s sibling networks MTV2 and mtvU each deliver unparalleled customized content for young males, music fans and college students, and its online hub MTV.com is the leading destination for music, news and pop culture. MTV is part of MTV Networks, a unit of Viacom (NYSE: VIA, VIA.B), one of the world’s leading creators of programming and content across all media platforms. For more information, go to www.mtvpress.com.

Friday, October 7, 2011

Florida eases penalties for teen 'sexting' - latimes.com

Florida eases penalties for teen 'sexting' - latimes.com: "Florida eases penalties for teens who send sexual photos
Previously, minors who sent or received such photos could have been charged as sex offenders. A first offense is now noncriminal."

www.circleofrespect.org

www.circleofrespect.org:

The Circle of Respect is the National Crime Prevention Council’s (NCPC) latest and most comprehensive campaign to protect youth from bullying and cyberbullying. Launching in October, the campaign seeks to change the commonly held belief that bullying is a rite of passage, and teaches instead that such behavior is unacceptable through a positive, pro-social message that encourages respect and consideration for others. To succeed in its mission, the Circle of Respect will feature an education campaign, outreach materials including publications and public service advertising, and partnership efforts to reach a national audience.


Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Learn About Netiquette With NetSmartz!



Learn About Netiquette With NetSmartz!

To view this email as a web page, click here. 

Get ready to hold your nose...because
“Bad Netiquette Stinks!"

Watch it now!

 

Our Newest Video...

NetSmartz Workshop proudly presents our newest NetSmartzKids adventure, “Bad Netiquette Stinks.” This useful resource will help children learn the important skill of using good manners online.

Join Clicky and his friends as they track down Webville Outlaw Potty-Mouth Pete and learn about the importance of using good netiquette. Then, take advantage of all of the corresponding materials to bring the lesson to life. In addition to the Activity Cards that accompany all NetSmartzKids videos, there is a video discussion guide that prompts children and trusted adults to talk about netiquette. Also, try the new Mini Activities: fun, quick activities that can be easily adapted for home or school. Using any of these materials will help you make the concept of netiquette tangible and appealing for children in grades K-5.

 

 

This email was sent by: National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
699 Prince Street Alexandria, VA, 22314, USA


 

 

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